Colleague information

This site is meant for colleagues who want to be better informed about posturology.

My name is Peter W.B.Oomens. I am a retired podopostural therapist (posturologist) since 2007. From 2007 till 2011 I have been chairman of the Dutch professional group.

My intention is to get posturology better known. With my knowledge and experience I think I can help other colleagues, by informing and coaching them. 

If you are interested and want some kind of support or coaching, please contact me by e-mail: peteroomens(at)xs4all(dot)nl or by phone: +31 (0)6 343442563.

Peter W.B.Oomens (Research on Posturology).

 

Why? 

Why has the human foot 19 intrinsic foot muscles plantar and dorsal only one?

Why has the human foot a plantar aponeurosis which other mammals have not?

Why has the human foot some strong plantar ligaments which other mammals have not?

Why is the bare foot sole equipped with numerous, pressure-sensitive receptors?

Why are the m.gluteus maximus and other hip abductors innervated from the same segments (L5 - S1) as the m.abductor hallucis? 

In other words, why is such an important, dynamic body part so often misunderstood in its function?

Take a closer look at one intrinsic foot muscle: the m.abductor hallucis. This muscle is the most medial muscle within the plantar foot and runs from the aspect of the calcaneus posteriormedial (whole bone) and inserts at the hallux. The function of this muscle is supinator of the 1st metatarsal, inverter or the heel bone, evertor of the tibia and supporter of the medial arch. Or in other words, this muscle helps muscles resist (excessive) foot pronation during midstance! 

Much attention in athletic performance is directed towards the negative impact of (excessive) foot pronation on lower extremity kinematics and knee / back pain. So how can we optimize strength action of the m.abductor hallucis? 

A 2011 study by Jung et al compared the levels of muscle activation during the common foot exercises toe-curl with short foot. Toe -curl is performed by placing the foot on a towel and curling the toes back, pulling the towel with the toes. The short – foot is performed by placing the foot flat on the floor, and trying to pull the metatarsal heads back toward the heel while keeping the toes relaxed.

Jung et al compared abductor hallucis muscle activation levels for both the toe-curl and short foot exercise, both in a sitting position and in a single-leg standing position. Jung et al found that the short -foot exercise had much higher abductor hallucis muscle activation levels when compared to toe-curl exercise had. Interestingly, Jung et al usefully found that when the exercise was performed in a single leg stance position, muscle activation was at its greatest (45 % vs. MVIC sitting. 73% MVIC single-leg stance). 

Jung et al. compared abductor hallucis muscle activation levels for both the toe-curl and short-foot exercise both in a sitting position and in a single-leg standing position.  Jung et al. found that the short-foot exercise had much higher abductor hallucis muscle activation levels when compared to toe-curl exercise.   Interestingly, Jung et al. also found that when the exercise was performed in a single leg stance position, muscle activation was at its greatest (45% MVIC sitting vs. 73% MVIC single-leg stance).  

What if we could improve our client's foot function through an exercise technique that targets both hip, knee and foot alignment - therefore improving movement patterns, reduce knee pain and back pain or improving athletic performance?
 

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